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2021 CONFERENCE PROGRAM

Tuesday, August 24, 2021

Workshops
8:00 AM - 12:00 PM

This workshop contains two sections. The first section is the overview and the update for the latest standards for LED and LED lighting from industry and the U.S. governments. In particular, the recent work being carried at ANSI/NEMA, IES, UL, ASABE, U.S. EPA, DLC, etc. for LED lighting applications. The second section introduces the standardized methods of measurements for LED packages and LED lighting products. It provides detailed explanations for the objectives, procedures, and rationale for measuring, testing and projecting the long-term behaviors of the LEDs and LED lighting products’ characteristics including photometry, radiometry, colorimetry, spectrum, luminous flux and color maintenance, thermal resistance, failure rate, etc. This workshop has been widely attended by interested parties from manufacturers, lighting design and specification communities, energy management programs, and other lighting practitioners.

In the highly competitive LED lighting market, manufacturers are seeking better and more cost-effective methods for producing custom lighting fixtures and components. Additive manufacturing (AM) technology, also called 3D printing, is fast approaching a state where it can be used to produce effective thermal, mechanical, and optical parts for lighting.

In this half-day workshop, moderator Nadarajah Narendran will lead a discussion with five presenters from the 3D printing and lighting fields who will discuss the status of 3D printing for lighting, specifically:

1) The types of print processes and materials available in the commercial market for 3D printing, and which of these technologies are best leveraged for the printing of lighting fixture components.

2) How to select and design lighting components for 3D printing, including how cost plays into selection and the possibility for consolidating parts.

3) Performance evaluations of 3D-printed thermal, optical, and mechanical lighting components, including comparisons to traditionally manufactured components.

4) Future research and development activities needed to advance 3D printing technology for lighting, and research collaboration opportunities for lighting and 3D printing manufacturers.
 

1:00 PM - 5:00 PM

“The biggest risk today is not the current global disruption – it’s relying on outdated strategies to deal with it .”

Even before the Covid-19 pandemic, lighting and technology companies faced many complex and fast-moving challenges. The pandemic has served to highlight many key vulnerabilities in all global systems and in the lighting industry – known, unknown, and completely unexpected – thus highlighting the need for resilience, decisive action in the midst of paralyzing chaos, and developing entirely new ways of seeing the future, surviving, and thriving.

Lighting the Way: The Executive Strategy Summit is designed for executive decision makers and investors in lighting, controls, and electronics manufacturing companies who need strategic decision support tools to help manage technology development and integration, sales and marketing, operations, logistics, SKU proliferation, certifications, code compliance, and supply chain coordination.

The four-hour summit will begin with brief presentations from leaders and experts from the lighting industry and other key industries vital to lighting, including IoT; architecture, engineering, and construction; controls; big data; energy; and security. Then different scenarios for the future of the industry will be presented and explained, and participants will break out in guided collaborative working groups to whiteboard ideas and propose strategies for the future. These will then be presented and critiqued by the entire summit group. Participants will receive both pre-summit preparation materials and a post-summit record of the results.

The basic principles of LED optics are straightforward but the application of this art mixed with science take years to master. You will hear from a veteran, practical designer showing worked out examples from sketch to full production. Audience participation will be encouraged as each product example is analyzed from a product marketing perspective leading to relevant optical requirements. While the focus will be LED optics, aspects of thermal engineering, mechanics and electronics will be interwoven providing a systems view with the main goal being light control and quality. Several software tools will be showcased but any main line program may be used to develop cost optimized LED light control optics. All are welcome and will benefit from this half day seminar. The open forum format will encourage questions and debate with the only goal to learn together how to make great LED lighting products.

Wednesday, August 25, 2021

Plenary Session
8:30 AM - 9:15 AM
9:15 AM - 10:00 AM
Session 1: Lighting Industry Dynamics
10:30 AM - 11:00 AM
The lighting industry's approach to design and operations has barely changed since WWII even with the introduction of the internet and LED's; business practices have become more convoluted. The automotive industry in comparison has become 60% more productive over the last 20 years by changing its design and manufacturing processes. We need systemic integration between design, manufacturing, distribution and construction. Each entity in the supply chain, from designers to contractors need to take into account the advantages and disadvantages of their decisions for other members in the chain. We know now that obtaining pricing, placing orders and tracking shipments could be as streamlined as Amazon and that possible increase in efficiency in our industry will lead to more opportunities for innovation and just as importantly, drastic growth of profits.
11:00 AM - 11:30 AM
11:30 AM - 12:00 PM
Session 2: Additive Manufacturing for Lighting
10:30 AM - 11:00 AM

Most consider 3D printing to be a quick way to prototype. However, innovation with additive manufacturing technology has made it viable for luminaire production today. This releases luminaire manufacturers and lighting designers from the traditional constraints of luminaire development to create products that have never been possible before. Lights with unique forms, lighting textures, and lighting distributions can be launched more quickly than with traditional technology. This session will explore the multiple additive manufacturing technologies and the challenges and opportunities in applying these to luminaire development and manufacturing.

11:00 AM - 11:30 AM

Additive manufacturing, better known as 3D printing, holds the promise for revolutionizing the lighting industry. During the past several years, the number of companies exploiting 3D printing to make attractive, custom lighting fixtures has been increasing. The U.S. Department of Energy is funding Eaton Corp., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute’s Lighting Research Center, and Xerox Corp. to investigate the development of an integrated LED lighting fixture that uses additively manufactured components, including thermomechanical, electrical, electronic, and optical structures. The main focus of this effort is to demonstrate the benefits to design, cost and performance enabled by 3D printing processes. This presentation will explain the lessons learned in producing these components, technology gaps encountered and the potential benefits realized using an additive manufacturing approach.

11:30 AM - 12:00 PM

Signify is excited to expand its offering of 3D Printed Luminaires with factories in the US, India and Indonesia. The company has perfected this highly flexible, more sustainable form of manufacturing, using a 100% recyclable polycarbonate material, which allows luminaires to be designed or tailored to customer’s exact needs and recycled at the end of their life. This sustainable form of manufacturing supports a circular economy globally. Signify’s investment and commitment in 3D printing further illustrates the commitment to better serve its customers’ carbon footprint impact while continuing to pursue Signify's goal as being the #1 leader in Sustainability and maintaining its top position in the Dow Jones Sustainability Index (DJSI). A typical manufactured luminaire (excluding electronics and optics) has a 47% lower carbon footprint than a conventionally manufactured metal luminaire. Nearly every component may be reused or recycled, supporting the principles of a circular economy.

Session 3: Lighting and Health
1:30 PM - 3:00 PM

Over the past decade, the discourse about lighting quality, so essential in the early days of solid state lighting, has given way to discourse about lighting and health, and Human-Centric Lighting (HCL). Despite much research that has engaged the biological sciences and to some degree the medical community, a clear definition of HCL has eluded most design practitioners; practical applications at scale are rare; actual benefits to building owners and occupants are unclear; and the need for more research remains paramount. Lighting and health in buildings has been very much in the center of the widespread trend towards “medicalizing” architecture, which is magnified and exacerbated by the Covid-19 pandemic.

The lighting industry needs direction on how to provide integrative lighting solutions that don’t focus on one aspect of HCL alone and that avoid overly complex, expensive or impractical solutions and integrate with common sense architectural design practice regarding daylighting and views. This panel discussion will present different perspectives on HCL and integrative lighting and help to outline goals and strategies for future design and product development for lighting the built environment.

Session 4: UV-C LED Fundamental Technology
1:30 PM - 2:00 PM

The COVID-19 pandemic caused by SARS-CoV-2 has raised awareness regarding the significant potential of UV-C LEDs. There is strong interest in new technology that can inactivate bacterial and viral pathogens, over and above chemical treatments and/or reliance on Hg-containing tube lamps, and recent technical breakthroughs in UV-C-transparent epitaxial structures provide important roadmap opportunities. In the near future, these developments and the associated pent-up demand will usher in an unprecedented era of UV-C LED and application development, open an untapped and underestimated billion-dollar market for LEDs; and make our world cleaner and safer. This talk will provide an up-to-date snapshot of III-Nitride UV-C LED technology and applications, and project an entitled performance and cost roadmap for the future.

2:00 PM - 2:30 PM
Achieving a P-type ohmic contact layer that is both transparent to the quantum well emission and simultaneously exhibiting low forward voltage is a critical milestone in the development of deep ultraviolet light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Packaged single-chip 270 nm LEDs with 200mW optical power and low forward voltage at 350mA had been demonstrated. This development paves the way for future UVC LEDs with above 40% wall-plug efficiencies. Rapid inactivation of pathogens such as flu and coronavirus can be achieved with such emitters, making them essential tools for future pandemic prevention.
2:30 PM - 3:00 PM

Far-UVC continues to gain market traction as the evidence mounts that it is safe and effective for occupied room disinfection. However, LEDs at these wavelengths remain elusive, and the only available light sources are based on gas-based lamp technology with many limitations. In this talk we will discuss NS Nanotech's new class of light emitter which leverages solid-state semiconductors, pulled from the LED industry and repurposed for this emergent need.

Session 5: Smart Buildings
3:30 PM - 5:00 PM

The concept of smart buildings has been around for fifty or sixty years. In the last decade the lighting industry has been pulled into the discourse, largely because lighting systems are convenient (and powered) locations for key technologies like sensors, cameras, and other data gathering gear. Also, as lighting controls become more sophisticated and complicated, we’re beginning to realize the possibilities of connecting them with other building controls and with energy management systems. But for the most part we have not been able to define what makes buildings “smart.” Much of the buzz has been technology focused, aspirational marketing hype with relatively little practical application. In the lighting industry, we’ve been thinking only inside the building for too long. As the need for unified climate action and grid stability continues to drive our thinking, we’re beginning to see that data and energy both need to flow in both directions- from the grid to buildings, and back. We’re beginning to understand that a smart building is a true “grid citizen,” that not only uses energy but produces, stores and sends it back to the grid. It’s also safe, resilient and healthy for occupants. For many reasons not often understood by lighting people, lighting systems and the lighting industry are central to the evolution of smart buildings. We have all the technologies we need now to make smart buildings a reality, what’s missing are design models, regulatory direction, and workforce training. This panel will explore how controls integration, energy services interface, and data gathering and analytics are driving the evolution of smart buildings, smart grid, and resilience in the energy infrastructure and built environment.

Session 6: Applications of UV-C Technology
3:30 PM - 5:00 PM

With the advent of the COVID-19 pandemic, there has been an increased interest in germicidal lighting to reduce the risk of airborne and surface contamination in healthcare and other facilities. As new solutions come to market, there is a need to use evidence from existing germicidal research to establish epidemiologically significant uses of UV-C technology. This panel session will explore the use and effectiveness of various types of UV-C technologies, ranging from discharge lamps to LEDs, in disinfection applications. The most suitable current applications of each technology will be discussed, along with potential applications in the post-pandemic environment. The outlook for the more widespread adoption of UV-C LEDs, as they become more efficient and lower in cost, will also be explored.

Thursday, August 27, 2021

Plenary Session
8:30 AM - 9:15 AM
9:15 AM - 10:00 AM
Session 7: Policy, Codes & Standards - California Lighting Update
10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

Codes, standards and policy are often viewed by manufacturers, specifiers, and builders as necessary evils, factors that get in the way of executing building projects. Few of us realize the essential nature of the regulatory function of government - policy and regulations drive markets. California’s Building Energy Efficiency Standards (Title 24 Part 6) is now undergoing one of the most significant updates in many years for the current 2022 code cycle.

California has been a global leader in reducing energy use in lighting over the past decade, and while efficiency will always be important, it’s no longer the singular driving force in lighting codes. Lighting is now playing a key role in the transition to healthier, more connected buildings that will eventually become full grid citizens, contributing to a resilient, carbon free grid.

This panel, comprised of some of the country’s top experts on policy, codes and standards in the lighting industry, will explain the 2022 code cycle Title 24 changes and updates and how they impact the lighting industry today. They will illustrate specific case studies in code measures that they’ve been directly involved in that demonstrate the mechanisms behind evolving better codes and standards; provide an overview of what factors to consider when planning products and projects; and discuss in detail lighting’s role in grid modernization and decarbonization.

Session 8: Lighting Controls
10:30 AM - 11:00 AM
11:00 AM - 11:30 AM

Illustrated by a series of software screen captures from various manufacturers, this seminar provides a view of what it is like to operate a networked lighting control system from the vantage point of the building/system operator, while also diving into various spaces and user types to provide a user perspective. With this application-based presentation method, the full spectrum of potential features, benefits, and pitfalls of networked lighting control are explored over a year, demonstrating the energy and non-energy benefits and typical functionality of these control systems, both integrated and not integrated with other systems.

11:30 AM - 12:00 PM

The announcement in late spring 2020 of a collaboration between Bluetooth SIG and DiiA (Digital Illumination Interface Alliance) to develop specifications for a standardized Bluetooth mesh interface for DALI-2 and D4i devices, which will enable connectivity with wireless Bluetooth mesh networks, highlights the growing recognition that interoperability is key to connected lighting solutions in today’s and tomorrow’s marketplace.

This session will explore three prominent interoperability standards: Bluetooth mesh for wireless communication interoperability; Zhaga for mechanical and electrical interoperability, and DALI for intra-luminaire communication interoperability. The presenter will examine each of these standards and how lighting infrastructures can incorporate each level of interoperability to add complementary functionality and extend capabilities beyond lighting to other value-added services.

Finally, the presenter will review some early projects that incorporate significant interoperability aspects and explore the lessons learned from these projects.

Session 9: Advanced Concepts in Lighting
1:00 PM - 1:30 PM

The practice of architectural placemaking through lighting has transformed dramatically in recent years, with technology such as addressable LED, sensors, projection, and advanced digital control systems pushing the boundaries of what is possible. A new industry is emerging that combines innovative lighting and fabrication techniques with new technologies traditionally used on the stage. The combination results in dynamic architectural centerpieces and interactive "light-art" installations that are being integrated into public and private spaces around the world. Two speakers, Robb Pope and Nick Moser will speak about the topic from two perspectives. Nick comes from a background of complex fabrication, and Robb from a background in creating innovative digital installations.

1:30 PM - 2:00 PM
2:00 PM - 2:30 PM
Session 10: Lighting Quality Metrics
1:00 PM - 1:30 PM

The lighting industry is in the midst of a transformation. Prior transformations were the result of technological advances that dramatically increased efficacy. As these advances level off and high efficacy is expected, the priority is shifting from efficacy to quality as the differentiating factor between luminaires. Specifiers and their clients place more value on the quality of light aspects for luminaires and manufacturers have a public avenue to differentiate their quality products in the DLC V5.1 SSL program. This policy, released in February 2020 with applications accepted in July, includes quality metrics such as TM-30, UGR, and BUG Ratings. This talk will include an overview of the industry’s performance using these quality metrics, hurdles in understanding or submission of DLC applications using these metrics, and further action that can be taken to highlight, promote, and expand quality luminaires to the users who are now demanding these attributes.

1:30 PM - 2:00 PM

Lighting has more effect on people than enabling us to see - it can also impact and affect our mood and health. The spectral engineering capability of LEDs presents opportunities to manipulate spectra, to enhance emission at certain wavelengths, or to improve the match to natural light. While there are differing schools of thought in our industry, delivering natural lighting is of interest to many human centric lighting advocates. This raises the question: how do we objectively quantify naturalness? Standard lighting quality metrics such as CRI and TM-30 do not fully address the naturalness question. This talk presents a new metric, Average Spectral Difference (ASD), which provides a quantitative measurement of how closely a light source matches the spectra of natural light. Spectra of various light sources will be reviewed, showing how ASD can be used to provide new insights into lighting quality, comparing and contrasting with other color quality metrics.

2:00 PM - 2:30 PM